Menu Close

Beyond the Proscenium

While the playing spaces for these performances run the gamut from outdoor sites to in-the-round, they all defy the standard orientation between dancers and audiences. Because many of the works seen here brought together performers and the public in unusual ways, audience members are glimpsed in many of these clips.

22 performances

-

Beyond the Proscenium

Next:

Brian Brooks

Viewpoint, 2021

During the same week when the Brian Brooks Moving Company was performing on the Pillow’s Henry J. Leir Stage, Brooks himself was showing some of the work he has been doing at the intersection of dance and technology. The tent where this presentation took place was a temporary structure set up on the Great Lawn.

More Details

Playing 1 of 22

Next:

Dorrance Dance

Ways to Now, 2021

As part of an ambitious engagement called “Dorrance Plays the Pillow,” Dorrance Dance presented a site-specific work including this section with Josette Wiggan-Freund in and around a cabin built in the 1930s by Fred Hearn, one of Ted Shawn’s Men Dancers.

More Details

Playing 2 of 22

Next:

Cirque Barcode and Acting for Climate Montréal

Branché, 2021

This Canadian ensemble sees performance as a way to call attention to climate change and other cultural issues, situating their Pillow presentations in wooded areas not usually experienced by the public.

More Details

Playing 3 of 22

Next:

Emily Johnson / Catalyst

"land / celestial" from Portals Into, Being Future Being, 2021

Emily Johnson brought focus to lesser-known areas of the Pillow grounds in three separate site-specific performances, all components of her project entitled Being Future Being.

More Details

Playing 4 of 22

Next:

Brother(hood) Dance!

Black on Earth, 2021

To commemorate the opening of Jacob’s Garden, Orlando Zane Hunter, Jr. and Ricarrdo Valentine created an outdoor work that considered the importance of food and those who grow and prepare it.

More Details

Playing 5 of 22

Next:

Freshwater Dancers

Eastern Blanket Dance / Canoe Dance, 2021

As part of the Eastern Woodland Dances program, this presentation of traditional Indigenous work was offered in the Perles Family Studio with fellow performers and audiences surrounding the action.

More Details

Playing 6 of 22

Next:

Abby Z and the New Utility

abandoned playground, 2019

The close proximity between dancers and audiences in this work by Abby Zbikowski made her virtuosic movement all the more thrilling—especially for those seated in the first row.

More Details

Playing 7 of 22

Next:

Monica Bill Barnes & Company

Happy Hour, 2018

Inhabiting a space that mimics an after-work office party, this atmospheric work, in fact, took place in the Pillow’s Ben and Estelle Sommers Studio.

More Details

Playing 8 of 22

Next:

Paramodernities by Netta Yerushalmy

Revelations: The Afterlives of Slavery, A Response to Alvin Ailey’s "Revelations" (1960), 2018

In this section of Netta Yerushalmy’s multi-part work entitled Paramodernities, scholar Thomas DeFrantz delivers his own text while the dancers embody movements from Alvin Ailey’s Revelations.

More Details

Playing 9 of 22

Next:

Faye Driscoll

Thank You For Coming: Attendance, 2017

While some can be wary of “audience participation,” Faye Driscoll conquered the fears of all who experienced Thank You For Coming: Attendance, as witnessed in the jubilant faces on display here.

More Details

Playing 10 of 22

Next:

Eiko Otake

A Body at the Pillow, 2017

Best known as part of the groundbreaking Eiko & Koma team, Eiko Otake has been creating solo works since 2014. Here she presented the site-specific A Body at the Pillow to celebrate the 85th Anniversary Season.

More Details

Playing 11 of 22

Next:

Kyle Abraham / Abraham.In.Motion

Dearest Home, 2017

In one of his most personal dances, Dearest Home, Kyle Abraham allows his audiences an up-close look at the dynamics at play in relationships of all kinds.

More Details

Playing 12 of 22

Next:

Compagnia TPO

Bleu!, 2014

As evidenced by the photo that concludes this clip, this family-friendly presentation invited audiences to physically interact with the performers.

More Details

Playing 13 of 22

Next:

Bill T. Jones / Arnie Zane Dance Company

Chapel/Chapter, 2008

The Doris Duke Theatre is almost unrecognizable in this setting which included a custom floor and voluminous red fabric that masked the natural wood walls in this space.

More Details

Playing 14 of 22

Next:

Compagnie Felix Ruckert

Deluxe Joy Pilot, 2003

This path-breaking Berlin-based choreographer presented the U.S. premiere of his Deluxe Joy Pilot, allowing dancegoers to choose what level of participation they preferred.

More Details

Playing 15 of 22

Next:

Wally Cardona Quartet

Morph: Live Remix, 2002

Whether you view it as audience members onstage or dancers in the audience—it all depends on how you perceive Morph: Live Remix and its especially intimate setting.

More Details

Playing 16 of 22

Next:

Ann Carlson

Night Light, 2001

The audience was constantly on the move to experience unique tableaux vivants created for the site-specific Night Light, presented throughout the Pillow grounds.

More Details

Playing 17 of 22

Next:

Beppie Blankert

Dubbelspoor/Double Track, 2000

The ingenious Dubbelspoor (Doubletrack) literally sandwiched its audiences between two stages and employed a large mirror to create the illusion of magical appearances.

More Details

Playing 18 of 22

Next:

Liz Lerman Dance Exchange

Site Specific Improvisation, 1995

This unconventional Inside/Out presentation interspersed the performers among audience members, dancing on rocks, benches, and tree stumps.

More Details

Playing 19 of 22

Next:

Yoshiko Chuma & The School of Hard Knocks, 1987

Yoshiko Chuma’s company was in the midst of a multi-week residency at the time of the 1987 Season Opening Gala, and this special presentation was part of the Gala festivities.

More Details

Playing 20 of 22

Next:

Peter Maxwell & Vicki Regan

Miller Melange, 1982

For a special Gala appearance in 1982, competitive ballroom dancers presented this excerpt from a group work, with audience members seated at café tables in the Sandra & David Bakalar Studio.

More Details

Playing 21 of 22

Manuel Alum

Made in Japan, 1981

A traditional Japanese platform known as a hanamichi transformed the Ted Shawn Theatre into a custom Kabuki-like environment for Manuel Alum’s Made in Japan.

More Details

Playing 22 of 22

Sign Up

Receive a monthly email with new and featured Jacob’s Pillow Dance Interactive videos, curated by Director of Preservation Norton Owen.


Close